I find your lack of faith disturbing.

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“Insanity is often the logic of an accurate mind overtasked. Good mental machinery ought to break its own wheels and levers, if anything is thrust among them suddenly which tends to stop them or reverse their motion. A weak mind does not accumulate force enough to hurt itself; stupidity often saves a man from going mad.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

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I have been in a great quandary over trusts. I do not know what attitude to take. I do not intend to play a demagogue, but on the other hand, I do intend to see that the rich man is held to the same accountability as the poor man. And when the rich man is rich enough to buy unscrupulous advice from very able lawyers, this is not always easy.
Theodore Roosevelt
in an August 15, 1899 letter to a friend

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A sick thought can devour the body’s flesh more than fever or consumption.
Guy de Maupassant, (b) Aug. 5, 1850

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Some men see things as they are and say, “Why?”
I dream things that never were and say, “Why not?”
Robert F. Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968)
via George Bernard Shaw

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Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Alexander Pope (May 21, 1688 – May 30, 1744)

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Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.
Horace Mann

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In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.
Thomas Jefferson

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When you are courting a nice girl, an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder, a second seems like an hour. That’s relativity.
Albert Einstein

Hemingway’s Advice on Writing, Ambition, the Art of Revision, and His Reading List of Essential Books for Aspiring Writers

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If I had to live life over, I’d live over a saloon.
W.C. Fields

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Few misfortunes can befall a boy which bring worse consequences than to have a really affectionate mother.
William Somerset Maugham, (b) Jan. 25, 1874

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We shall strive for perfection. We shall not achieve it immediately — but we still shall strive. We may make mistakes — but they must never be mistakes which result from faintness of heart or abandonment of moral principle.

I remember that my old schoolmaster, Dr. Peabody, said, in days that seemed to us then to be secure and untroubled: “Things in life will not always run smoothly. Sometimes we will be rising toward the heights—then all will seem to reverse itself and start downward. The great fact to remember is that the trend of civilization itself is forever upward; that a line drawn through the middle of the peaks and the valleys of the centuries always has an upward trend.”
Franklin D. Roosevelt, Fourth Inaugural Address
Saturday, January 20, 1945

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A lottery is a taxation
upon all the fools in creation;
and heaven be praised,
it is easily raised,
for credulity’s always in fashion.
Henry Fielding, “The Lottery” – 1732

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And if a beachhead of co-operation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure, and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.
John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address, January 20, 1961

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Anti-war books are as likely to stop war as anti-glacier books are to stop glaciers.
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

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Do not do what someone else could do as well as you. Do not say, do not write what someone else could say, could write as well as you. Care for nothing in yourself but what you feel exists nowhere else. And, out of yourself create, impatiently or patiently, the most irreplaceable of beings.
André Gide

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I don’t know a better preparation for life than a love of poetry and a good digestion.
Zona Gale, b. Aug 26, 1874

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Great minds that are healthy are never considered geniuses, while this sublime qualification is lavished on brains that are often inferior but are slightly touched by madness.
Guy de Maupassant, (b) Aug. 5, 1850

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There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.
from The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you’re finished, you’ll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird … So let’s look at the bird and see what it’s doing — that’s what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.
Richard P. Feynman